In a seemingly unstoppable and swift movementgalleries, art dealers, art aficionados, trend-spotters, and urban socialites—are flocking to the Lower East Side to enjoy the charms of the experimental food scene, hip and often quirky bars at every corner, the thriving nightlife, and of course, the ubiquitous art presence. From street art, to endless graffiti tags and random public installations, the art scene is evidently booming especially as many galleries, established and new, make their way downtown to partake in the infinite energy.

Located solidly in the Lower East Side, right next to Two Bridges and a just a few blocks from the East River, Sargent’s Daughters first opened its doors in November 2013 as the joint venture of dealer Allegra LaViola and Meredith Rosen, former director of BravinLee programs in Chelsea.

The East Broadway physical location was converted from LaViola’s eponymous gallery into the current gallery space. In an area mostly dedicated to minimalist, conceptual, and experimental contemporary art, Sargent’s Daughters stands out as a gallery focusing on more traditional mediums such as painting, drawing, and sculpture with the intent to bridge the gap between the historic and classical and more modern contemporary aesthetics. LaViola and Rosen search for innovation within already established mediums, genres, and aesthetic conceptions to prove that the contemporary can have strong ties to the past in interesting and meaningful ways. Quality with a sense of tradition and lineage trump overt flash and quirky trends in this gallery space.

Owner and Director, Meredith Rosen, shares what this joint venture is all about with Art Versed as well as her views on working within the art world.


Installation of Deborah Kass's "America's Most Wanted," on view May 20--June 28, 2015. Courtesy of Sargent's Daughters.
Installation of Deborah Kass’s “America’s Most Wanted,” on view May 20–June 28, 2015. Courtesy of Sargent’s Daughters.

What is Sargent’s Daughters mission? 

Our interest is in artists whose work combines the qualities of tradition and cutting edge.

In addition to exhibitions by represented gallery artists, Sargent’s Daughters creates collaborations as a platform for exploring new conversations within a wider context of galleries, artists and objects.

What were the motivations behind making the switch in 2013 from working at BravinLee programs in Chelsea to opening Sargent’s Daughters in the Lower East Side with Allegra LaViola? 

I wanted to be able to work with artists and create ambitious exhibitions without the constraints of an existing platform.  My partnership with Allegra had a lot to do with timing and instinct.

As a relatively recent space, was it difficult getting the gallery up on its feet? 

Of course! To do anything well is very hard, but I love the challenge. I think the gallery model is constantly changing so as a dealer you can never get too comfortable.

Everyone seems to be saying that the Lower East Side is turning into the new gallery quarter—what were your reasons for moving into the neighborhood and has the location proved favorable to you?  

We love our location.  It’s a great space, across from a park and right next to the subway.

Installation of Donald Baechler's "Recent Works," on view November 18--December 20, 2015. Courtesy of Sargent's Daughters.
Installation of Donald Baechler’s “Recent Works,” on view November 18–December 20, 2015. Courtesy of Sargent’s Daughters.

I’ve read in previous interviews that you chose the name “Sargent’s Daughters” in reference to John Singer Sargent, regarding him as a risqué innovator within his time. Can you explain this concept in relation to contemporary art and how it fits into your vision for the gallery?  

We loved that John Singer Sargent was an innovator working in a traditional medium and wanted this statement to represent the context of our growing program.  We exhibit work that has a strong historical lineage by artists who push the limits of contemporary art today – formally through various mediums and intellectually through their choice of content.

What kind of artists, if there even is a specific, are you looking to represent? 

We aren’t interested in a specific kind of work.  We are always interested in work of the highest quality whether it’s something brand new or shedding new light on an artist with an established presence.

Cy Gavin, The Future of Tucker's Point, 2015. Courtesy of Sargent's Daughters.
Cy Gavin, The Future of Tucker’s Point, 2015. Courtesy of Sargent’s Daughters.

Do you have a favorite from the shows you’ve put on? 

Our last exhibition by Cy Gavin is one of our best exhibitions to date.  I really feel each show gets better and better as we have more experience, reflect on past exhibitions and create a stronger dialogue with gallery artists.

What makes Sargent’s Daughters different from other galleries? 

When we opened most galleries on the LES were interested in building programs with young and emerging artists.   We didn’t open with a roster of artists.  We started putting together the best shows we possibly could with the artists we discovered and established artists that we admire.

Anton van Dalen, Bird Car, 1987. Courtesy of Sargent's Daughters.
Anton van Dalen, Bird Car, 1987. Courtesy of Sargent’s Daughters.

Do you have any future plans for the gallery that drastically differ from what you are doing now? 

To hopefully grow our program and with the artists we bring to the table.

What are your thoughts on the art market today and the increasing interest and importance of art fairs and biennials?

I think art fairs are very important to build an international audience for wide range of artists.  I find it very interesting to go to an event where I can see so many dealers in action. You can learn so much by example.   

Who is your favorite non-contemporary artist?  

Picasso

What is your favorite museum (world-wide range)? 

Fondation Beyeler – I look forward to seeing their exhibitions every June when in Basel.

Sargent’s Daughters

179 E Broadway, New York, NY 

 

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