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In talk with Juliette Losq




Juliette Losq is a London based artist, both born and raised in the city. Before taking an artistic path, she undertook an immersive training as an art historian, graduating with an MA in art history from the Courtauld Institute of Art 1 and continuing on to study fine art. Having had a number of solo and group exhibitions in the past, the artist mostly works with traditional technique of watercoloring, though adding a touch of contemporaneity to the artistic feel of a piece. I caught up with Juliette in her studio in Southwark (n.b. the artist just moved to a new location, DZ), where surrounded by a variety of her pieces we talked about art, literature, and life.












  1. How do you see contemporary art per say and its purpose, if there is any.


I don't really see it's having a single purpose. I just feel like it's got to that point where if you're making contemporary art you can use any medium to make it that you feel fitting to your ideas, so I don't think anyone's really restricted anymore to painting, drawing, sculpture...




  1. Do you think it's in a way easier to be a successful artist because there are so many types of medium you can use, or are there so many different choices you can make that it's in fact harder?


I think it's always been hard – artists have always struggled. It's probably more difficult to be recognized for a particular medium as a standout person within that medium because it's no longer just about being a painter or a sculptor, or even a photographer, is it, you can mix them all together and be making work in all of them, which a lot of successful artists do.




  1. So be original in a way...



It's always been difficult to be original hasn't it, but it seems that throughout history people just look around them and see what's come before them and then just reimagine it or reuse it in some way, so it is like the most exciting people are aware of what's happened before or a range of things that've happened before and then they're changing it in their own particular way.




  1. Is that something you're trying to do because you're using techniques of watercolour?


Technically I do look way back to 19th century painting and drawing, I look at things like the Hudson River School 2 who are American landscape painters, and I look at the pre­Raphaelites in terms of their colour, not in terms of their subject matter. I look at etching, woodcuts; I just like to collect images. I must be drawn to particular things because they sort of feed into the work, if not instantly then a little bit further down the line. But I do definitely like the aesthetics of print and graphic drawing.




  1. But it's still a traditional art form seen through contemporary eyes?


Sure, because we can't avoid that. Instantly, I'm filtering it through contemporary vision but definitely I'm interested in changing historical techniques slightly so even though I'm using materials that have been used traditionally in watercolour, I'm doing it slightly differently, so I might be using watercolour more in the way that you might use ink as a drawing tool. I use modern mediums with watercolour as well, so things that have only been invented or refined into their current fom maybe in the past 50 years or so.




  1. For instance?


I use something called masking fluid which is a stopper, so I can stop the ink from touching the paper at all and then remove it right at the end to just have the raw paper, so it's almost like diluted latex solution.




  1. So do you research these kind of things in advance?


Well it's trial and error, really. But the way I happened upon it was because I liked the process of etching and I worked out a way of reimagining that process using ink and watercolour and this masking fluid stuff so rather than building up an etching plate I was building up an individual image in the same way you would, so you have to have a certain knowledge of materials but then you just experiment until you find something that you're happy with, and then it's always interesting when someone takes something to the extreme limits of how you can use it, so I guess I try to do that.




  1. Also, watercolour was always an artwork of a smaller scale, and you are trying to make it a large­scale piece?


Definitely, I think that's a different way of using it. Traditionally it was used as a sketching medium, but I really do enjoy working on a large scale with it and I think that's another way of making something contemporary that's historically been used in a different way.




  1. I know you studied art history first. You are an art historian. Were you always fascinated with the 19th century art practice? Did you want to be an art historian or an artist after all?


I always wanted to be an artist really but I think I was too easily persuaded out of it when I was at school. They wanted me to do an academic subject, and I did enjoy studying art history. I was drawn to particular eras, it was 18th and 19th century, because if you look at some of those 19th c paintings, the pre-­Raphaelite 3 ones are almost photographic and you just wonder, it was always fascinating to me how did they get that effect, ignoring the subject matter, the vibrancy of them... it still looks hyper real now when you look at some of those paintings.




  1. So would you say that they are your inspiration?


Not really, there's lots of things that go into it, there's literature...




  1. British?


Mainly British, I suppose. Things like old magazines and newspapers that I read and found and collected and images that appear in films, also objects...




  1. Just everyday objects, or?


Sometimes specific things I collect, I literally trawl ebay until I find something interesting, just a cover of an old newspaper or a poster for a film, and I've just acquired them and had a few walls of my studio plastered with pictures that could then become an inspiration for something else. There's only a couple left up there now but like. Right now I'm quite interested in looking at traditional Chinese painting... Those artists were not bothered about whether a landscape really can make sense as we would think about it in terms of Western perspective; they're just narrating a landscape almost, which is quite interesting.




  1. So that's what you're doing with your landscapes in terms of trying to make them realistic, isn't it, though could you elaborate on why it is landscapes that you're mostly interested in and what's behind them?


I guess it's the idea of using the real world as an inspiration for creating your own environment, and that's what happens with the big installations as well, I'm using elements of the real world but reconstructing them to form my own...




  1. World...


Yeah. It is not a real place, but obviously I've taken elements of real places and reconstructed them, and I do the same thing when I'm making one of those installations, I take elements of a real landscape and put them back together a different way and then blow that up into a large installation.




  1. In terms of a viewer, are you trying to communicate something to them? Perhaps an experience?


I want them to be drawn into that world, I want it to be believable and I want them to... yeah I want them to experience... You're looking at somewhere where society is broken down a bit and you're just surrounded by nature, which I do quite like the idea of. I want you to be drawn into it and then find something in it that you think is a bit jarring or not quite right so it's slightly threatening and also quite enticing at the same time. I'm often thinking about science fiction films where they're set in these kind of broken down landscapes and certain horror films, post­apocalyptic films but I'm not seeing them in that way, I'm not seeing these landscapes as being totally threatening...




  1. So that's why you're trying to make it look wild, or imperfect?


I just like imperfection, I always have done as a child being brought up in London just finding places that are overgrown because it is unusual to find an area of greenery or an area of interest, or an area that you could crawl into or make a den in in the middle of the city. I read a lot of science fiction, so for me, it's not a reference to something, but it kind of reminds me of all the imaginary cities or buildings in the books and comics.


I saw some really nice illustrations for Jules Verne 4...




  1. He's classic.


I saw some etchings by Édouard Riou 5.... it was this underwater scene with jellyfish floating like clouds, wacky things like that...




  1. In terms of being an artist today, do you think it's important to finish university to be actually qualified in terms of MFA, for instance, in fine arts to be successful?


I think life is always more difficult if you haven't been through the art school system. I do know people who have gone straight from another degree. I know someone who did a languages degree and then went into art but in a different sphere, but I just think generally, your life would be a lot easier if you studied at art school. I think an MA can help as well if it comes at a time when you're ready to break down your work and then go back and refine your own practice, it's also good for meeting people and getting exhibiting opportunities. But there is a whole raft of outsider artists who have not studied at art school. The Museum of Everything 6 is a great place to see this kind of art.




  1. Do you have a favourite artist? Or an artist who is your inspiration?


I like Samuel Palmer 7, some 18th c artists, quite like Rococo design rather than painting, so things they did for designing ornaments, they call it rocaille. 
Contemporary artists... I like the installation artist Wade Kavanaugh 8. Mark Fairnington 9 was a tutor of mine and is a great painter. I met some interesting painters through the John Moores Painting Prize 10Neal Rock 11, Mandy Payne 12, Conor Rogers 13


  1. Would you ever think about trying another medium?


At the moment I'm mainly working on paper, when I was at the RA I was doing oil painting, I tried acrylic painting as well. I definitely wouldn't mind, I mean, I suppose for me it's more about mixing 2­D and 3­D so I like doing installations and I like the way that they evolve over time and the way that they can be changed when you put them somewhere new. I like collecting objects and thinking about where those objects might lead. I've got a show coming up next year where I'm making a new installation which is going to be in collaboration with a furniture maker, so he's going to make a non­functional piece of furniture that looks like it should have a purpose but actually it's always going to be quite Escher­like, and then my drawing will respond to it. That's a bit of a new direction.




  1. And finally do you have a few words of advice for young artists or young people in general?


I think it's easy to be put off by people. So be consistent, put in the hours, do the work, don't worry too much about where it's going to end up, just have a body of work that you're interested in, make it according to your own interests, not according to what you think you ought to be doing because everybody else is doing it. And other than that, someone gave me the advice that as long as you're continuing to work, eventually it will go somewhere or it will feed into some other work that does. It's when you give up and get out of the habit it of it that you can lose it.

Links:
  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Courtauld_Institute_ of_Art
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hudson_River_School
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-Raphaelite_Broth erhood
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jules_Verne
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Édouard_Riou
  6. http://musevery.com/
  7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Palmer
  8. http://wadekavanaugh.info/home.html
  9. http://www.markfairnington.com
  10. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Moores_Painting _Prize
  11. http://www.nealrock.com
  12. http://mandypayneart.co.uk
  13. http://www.paper-gallery.co.uk/335378/4487780/pape r-associates/conor-rogers
Post date: 2015-12-07 08:18:12
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