January 2017

Knock knock! Art news here! London Art Fair 2017 opened to the public and 129 galleries showed some of the most exciting, fresh and sexy art collections! The social confusion of 2015-2016 seems to have created the environment for the most beautiful clarity in art. Art screams at you this year. It wants to be on your wall, not in a museum.

John Piper, Public Bar. Courtesy of the Waterhouse & Dodd

Many young entrepreneurs are now looking to invest in an alternative asset class. They want to use their new fortunes to invest in something that gives them a visual satisfaction. They are aware of the fact that they might discover a new Richter. Galleries are exploiting this feeling with marketing, doing a great job parenting the relationships between young artists and young collectors. Talent is being exploited beautifully and respectfully and not just experimented with.
This year’s London Art Fair enabled collecting at all levels, from museum quality Modern British art to the very new in contemporary art. 17 different countries including China, France, Germany, South Korea and the USA marked the most international edition of the fair to date.

Juliette Losq, Lethe. Courtesy of the Waterhouse & Dodd

The Fair also welcomed The Lightbox Woking as their 2017 Museum partner, celebrating their 10th anniversary with a curated exhibition of highlights from The Ingram Collection entitled ‘Ten Years: A Century of Art’, situated at the front of the fair.
As new features and highlights for 2017, The London Art Fair offers Modern British art with Waterhouse & Dodd’s debut in the pavilion; new galleries such as Christopher Kingzett Fine Art, Katharine House Gallery, Beaux Arts London and Peter Harrington Gallery. Many contemporary art galleries are making their international debut at the fair, including Pi Artworks (Istanbul/London), Atelier Aki (Seoul) and Victor Lope Arte Contemporaneo (Barcelona). The Art Projects ‘Dialogues’ curated by Miguel Amado, presented a series of five collaborations between galleries encouraging new forms of representation and fostering relationships on a global scale. ‘Stranger Collaborations’ showcases artistic collaborations formed via the internet and is curated by Pryor Behrman in the Art Projects Screening Room. The Fair also highlighted ‘Photo50: Gravitas’ a group of exhibitions of lens-based works curated by Christian Monarchi, founding editor of Photomonitor and contemporary Korean artist Jaye Moon’s LEGO street art sculptures, installed by Hanoi Gallery in locations throughout the Fair.
London retains the status of a global arts hub even post-Brexit and as Sarah Monk, Director of the London Fair, commented: ‘the exhibitors are used to riding out the ups and downs of the economy.’ Indeed, the overall feeling that I got from last year was that art is thriving in today’s context.

Jeff Robb, Unnatural Causes 20. Courtesy of the Pontone Gallery

Our top pick galleries this year were: Flowers, Waterhouse & Dodd, Tag Fine Art with the Hanbury Collection, Sardac Gallery, GBS Fine Art, Pontone Gallery and of course Hanmi, which was also one of our favorites of last year. Make sure to stop by Skipwiths as well to see amazing Kwang Young Chun, a star on the rise.
There is a radical return to beauty: nature, simplicity, clean shapes and colors and I must emphasize again, a return to sexy! Art this year is refreshing, cool, exciting and it could just turn into a love affair. In a time when experts fail to give the right predictions and answers, when society is at a turning point, art seems to be the way out for life and society. This little black book of the global feeling gathers all the cultural influences, interconnections and togetherness against all odds.
Art is real and real has just got surreally good!

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