From magazine covers to digital advertising, illustration has endless applications that we consume on a daily basis. Thanks to such events as The London Illustration Fair, this form of art is only becoming more and more popular every year. In Spain, illustrated books are currently capturing the imagination of wider audiences, while the number of exhibitions dedicated to the work of illustrators has multiplied in the past few years. Below is just a small selection of the amazing talent spread throughout the country.

Elena Odriozola

Elena Odriozola, Illustration for 'Frankenstein' (Nórdica Libros, 2013)

Elena Odriozola, Illustration for ‘Frankenstein’ (Nórdica Libros, 2013)

Simple but very powerful compositions and a subtle use of colour are the trademarks of Elena Odriozola’s work. Her beautiful illustrations for Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (Nórdica Libros, 2013) are one of her most interesting projects so far. She has recently received the 2015 Spanish National Illustration Award for the “capacity for renewal” and the “narrative potential” of her work.

Maria Herreros

Maria Herreros. Illustration for “Marilyn tenía once dedos en los pies” (“Marilyn Had Eleven Toes on Her Feet”).

Maria Herreros. Illustration for “Marilyn tenía once dedos en los pies” (“Marilyn Had Eleven Toes on Her Feet”).

Maria Herreros’s drawings are full of life and animation. She uses mainly graphite and watercolour to recreate, in her own style, the image of film stars and pop culture icons. She has just published her book Marilyn tenía once dedos en los pies (Marilyn Had Eleven Toes on Her Feet, Lunwerg, 2016), a carefully illustrated collection of Hollywood anecdotes and curiosities that constitutes a unique and fascinating trip through the history of cinema.

Pablo Amargo

Pablo Amargo. Illustrations for The Boston Globe.

Pablo Amargo. Illustrations for The Boston Globe.

Pablo Amargo conceives his illustrations as a poetic clash between image and word. He looks for the unexpected and establishes a certain distance between his visual world and the writings that he illustrates, so the readers can establish their own connections between text and image. I love how he manages to play with visual paradoxes and double meanings through a very clear and direct style. You may have seen his work in The New York Times, The New Yorker, or The Boston Globe, with whom he regularly collaborates.

Fernando Vicente

Fernando Vicente. Illustration for Lewis Carroll’s “Through the Looking-Glass” (Nórdica Libros, 2016).

Fernando Vicente. Illustration for Lewis Carroll’s “Through the Looking-Glass” (Nórdica Libros, 2016).

Fernando Vicente’s stunningly sophisticated images, particularly his portraits, are some of the most recognisable in Spanish illustration today, although his work first appeared in different magazines during the 1980s. He has reimagined the works of Jane Austen, Lewis Carroll, Arthur Conan Doyle, Bram Stoker, and Emily Brontë, among many others, and has also recently illustrated a book about the Spanish Civil War (La Guerra Civil contada a los jóvenes, Alfaguara, 2015).

Paula Bonet

Paula Bonet, “Please Come Back”.

Paula Bonet, “Please Come Back”.

What I find most interesting about Paula Bonet’s creations is that she is often her own model. Her lively self-portraits are emotionally charged and often illustrate strong human emotions through the use of expressive colours, dark lines, and dramatic gestures. She explores her interest in film in one of her latest projects, 813 (La Galera, 2015), an illustrated homage to François Truffaut.

Oscar Llorens

Oscar Llorens, “Migraine” project.

Oscar Llorens, “Migraine” project.

Oscar Llorens’s work seems to be inspired by street art and technology. His most personal projects usually feature strange, half-animal half-machine creatures that are often suspended in the air. One of these, entitled Migraine, explores the pain and sensations felt by those who suffer from this disorder. Coca Cola, Mercedes, Cirque du Soleil, and Red Bull are among the companies that have chosen Llorens’s intricate designs for their advertising campaigns.

Cinta Arribas

Cinta Arribas. Illustration for the website 0034expat.com.

Cinta Arribas. Illustration for the website 0034expat.com.

Cinta Arribas likes telling stories through her art. Her work is fresh and optimistic, but not in any way naïve. I particularly like her ability to simplify shapes and the eloquence of her characters’ poses and gestures. If you are feeling adventurous, check out her awesome map with all the European St James’ routes to the city of Santiago de Compostela, featured in the book A Map of the World. The World According to Illustrators and Storytellers (Gestalten, 2013).

Carla Fuentes

Carla Fuentes, “MOTELS-2” (2015).

Carla Fuentes, “MOTELS-2” (2015).

What first caught my attention about Carla Fuentes‘s work were her wonderful portraits, in particular those from her recent personal project Los Sentados. Through her very distinctive palette and the spontaneity of her lines Fuentes captures the character not only of people, but also of places. One example of this is her Motels series, inspired by the work of American photographer Stephen Shore.

Jesus Cisneros

Jesus Cisneros. Illustration for Charles and Mary Lamb’s “Tales from Shakespeare” (Castillo, 2015).

Jesus Cisneros. Illustration for Charles and Mary Lamb’s “Tales from Shakespeare” (Castillo, 2015).

Minimalist, enigmatic, and very evocative. Jesus Cisneros’s illustrations take us into a different world, one populated by small characters that seem in complete harmony with their mysterious surroundings. Cisneros’s unique style comes from his exquisite technique and great sensitivity. In his creations, colour becomes particularly relevant through its scarce but significant presence.

 Ricardo Cavolo

Ricardo Cavolo, “Sea Wolf”.

Ricardo Cavolo, “Sea Wolf”.

Ricardo Cavolo’s work is full of detail, symbolism, and eyes, eyes everywhere! He takes inspiration from old school tattoos, art history icons such as Frida Kahlo, and myths from different cultures to create bold and colourful illustrations and murals. If you want to dive into his very personal style, I recommend his book 101 Artists To Listen To Before You Die (Nobrow Press, 2015). A real treat for music lovers!

 

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